Tag: GF

 

 

                                                                                  

Braised cabbage with lamb – Kapuska

Braised cabbage with lamb – Kapuska

Winter cabbages are so sweet and tasty, especially when braising gives the such a silky taste. Stuffed cabbage leaves may very well be my winter favorite, but we’ll leave those for another day. In this recipe we are looking a a very easy, fast, midweek,…

 Skillet chicken with creamed beat leaves

 Skillet chicken with creamed beat leaves

If you’re looking to add more greens to your plates, this is a great start. Beet leaves are delicious, sweeter than spinach which will score points with the kids and so pretty. Combined with ever popular chicken and cream that makes everything taste better, its a sure thing. I prefer to use free range chickens, here is some more info on that.

I always buy beets whith their leaves as they are a sign of freshness. I slice the bunch of leaves off the beets and give them a quick wash. I then put roll them up in parchment paper with some olive oil, place them in the dutch oven and roast them for about an hour. Once they’ve cooled down a bit, you can easily rub off their skins. You can use gloves or peel them under running water to avoid pink stains on you hands.

While the beets are roasting, I soak the leaves in lots of water with a little vinegar. They ‘re ready after 2-3 washes. I save the tiny tender leaves to use fresh in our salads and braise the larger leaves to make a delicious, creamy side for out chicken. They will seem like a lot but they wilt down to nothing so you can add them in batches if they don’t fit initially in the pan.

The best thing about this recipe is that it can be made in 30′ using a single pot, so you can enjoy it on a weekday without having to wash up half your kitchen afterwards. You are going to need a large pan, I used my Lodge skillet that I am falling in love with. It is so easy to use.

 Recipe

  • 2 tbsp ghee or olive oil
  • 4 free range chicken breasts
  • 2 tsp coriander, ground
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves, sliced
  • 1 big bunch of beet greens
  • 250 ml stock, hot
  • 1 small potato, grated
  • 250 ml heavy cream
  • Nutmeg

Warm up the skillet on a medium heat. Dry the fillets well and season with coriander salt and pepper. Add half the oil and pan fry for 8 minutes on each side until cooked through. Set aside.

Heat the remaining oil and cook the onion until softened, about 5′. Add the garlic, stir through and add the beer leaves in batches to wilt with the hot stock and the grated potato. Allow to simmer for 5′. Add the cream and grate in 1/3 of the nutmeg or to taste and simmer for another 5′. Return the chicken to the pan to heat through and serve.

Whole braised cauliflower kapama

Whole braised cauliflower kapama

Kapama is a traditional way of braising in Greece, by placing a pot on top of a baking tray. I first tasted cauliflower kapama made the traditional way at my Aunt Sophia’s. This is an everyday, simple dish, usually served during the period of Lent…

Greek Sofigado stew with quince

Greek Sofigado stew with quince

Sofigado is a traditional recipe from the Ioanian island of Lefkada made with yearling goat or lamb. Modern versions include beef, but the strong deep-flavored sweet and sour sauce really complements darker red meats. As potatoes used to be scarce towards the end of autumn,…

Baked eggs in two ways

Baked eggs in two ways

I was very lucky to see a recipe of Jamie Oliver’s for baked eggs on Sunday morning. I happened to have all the ingredients for the Mexican version and decided to try it. I admire him incredibly for his quality, well-designed recipes. His simple presentation and clear instructions were an inspiration to me. I really felt that following him could make me a very good cook. The most important thing though is his dedication to quality: free range animal products, traditional recipes and balanced dietary choices.

As I was preparing the eggs, I remembered the Turkish eggs I wanted to try and kept putting it off. Mostly, because it involved 2-3 pots as well as poaching eggs, which is not, exactly my strong point. So I thought I’d use the basic principles of Jamie Oliver’s recipe and apply them to Turkish eggs. The experiment worked, it was delicious. In this version the whole process does not take more than 10 ‘-12 ‘ including preparation. This means that you can have them for breakfast even on a weekday, or for a quick meal on a busy day.

Take a look at both recipes and see which one you prefer.

Jamie Olivier’s Mexican Style Baked Eggs

You will find the original here. I’ve made absolutely no changes, because the man is a genius.

Baked Turkish Eggs

  • 250 ml Greek yogurt
  • 1 small clove of garlic, crushed
  • 2 large eggs, free range
  • 2 tbsps clarified butter
  • 1 tbsp paprika
  • A pinch of chili flakes
  • Salt and pepper

Preheat oven to hottest setting. Stir the garlic and a little salt into the yogurt. Lightly grease a small ovenproof dish with butter and spread the yogurt. Make two dents that will hold the eggs. Break break an egg into each dent carefully. Bake for about 8 minutes, or until the egg whites are set and the yolks are still runny.

Meanwhile, melt the butter, add the paprika and chili flakes and stir well until incorporated. Take the eggs out of the oven and pour the butter over them. Season with salt and pepper and serve with sourdough bread.

How to always have nutritious pulses handy

How to always have nutritious pulses handy

When preparing beans I usually soak and sprout twice the amount needed for my recipe. Leftover pulses are stored in the freezer for immediate use in another recipe. What does “sprouting” mean? First, I wash the pulses well. Then, I soak them in plenty of…

“Lemonato” Beef with broccoli and lemon sauce

“Lemonato” Beef with broccoli and lemon sauce

In the midst of this constant barrage of information on modern nutrition, the value of vegetables remains constant and undeniable. In the traditional Mediterranean diet, we very often see imaginative combinations of vegetables with (sometimes only a little) meat or fish, depending on the season…

Roast chicken with corn and chickpeas

Roast chicken with corn and chickpeas

This is one of our favorite recipes, made throughout late summer and early autumn. With the beautiful Indian summer we’ve been having this October, I was happy to make it with the last fresh corn from the Farmer’s market. Like a farewell to the bright and sunny days this summer brought, before starting preparations for a cosy winter.

If you own a vertical chicken roaster, by all means use it by standing it in the middle of the roasting pan. Just ignore instructions to turn the chicken and remember to empty the chicken’s cooking juices into the pan every 20-30 minutes or so. If you don’t have one, just start the chicken roasting by laying it down on one breast, then the other, then laying it on its back. It is a bit fiddly, but it’s also the best way to ensure even cooking and a nice crispy skin.

I almost always use free-range chickens these days. They are humanely raised and the taste is far superior, so do try and get the best quality you can find, it really does make a difference. Also keep the carcass bones and simmer them the next day for a quick and well flavored chicken stock.

Ingredients

  • 1 free-range chicken, about 1.4 kg
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 onion, roughly chopped
  • 2 red peppers, roughly chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tbsp cider vinegar
  • 1 tsp marjoram
  • 1 tsp thyme
  • 2 tbsp palm sugar
  • 250 ml chicken stock
  • 700 gr corn on the cob
  • 3 cups chickpeas, cooked
  • 50 gr butter, softened
  • 2 tsp paprika
  • salt and pepper

Mix the softened butter with the paprika and seasoning. Spread all over the chicken and place it in a large roasting tin, lying it on one breast. Preheat the oven to 200C. Heat enough water to boil the corn in.

In the meantime, heat the oil in a large frying pan and add the onion, peppers and garlic. Cook, stirring for 4-5 minutes, until golden. Add the Worcester sauce, cider vinegar, marjoram, thyme, palm sugar and stock. Bring to the boil and simmer, uncovered for 5 minutes. Boil the corn for 5 minutes, then reserve 300 ml of cooking liquid. Drain and slice thickly. Add to the roasting tin with the chicken and spoon over the chickpea mixture.

Roast the chicken for 20′, then turn to the other breast, baste well and roast for another 20′. Turn the chicken on its back and cook for another 20′. Add the reserved cooking liquid and stir through then roast for a final 20′. Total roasting time should be around 1 hour 20′.

Minced lamb with chickpeas

Minced lamb with chickpeas

The original recipe is called Keema Chole and is Indian, belonging to Punjabi cuisine. It exists in many traditional versions, but this is not one of them. I prefer a somewhat drier and faster version by Mark Bittman that I saw on NYT Cooking, made…