Recent Posts

Braised cabbage with lamb – Kapuska

Braised cabbage with lamb – Kapuska

Winter cabbages are so sweet and tasty, especially when braising gives the such a silky taste. Stuffed cabbage leaves may very well be my winter favorite, but we’ll leave those for another day. In this recipe we are looking a a very easy, fast, midweek,…

 Skillet chicken with creamed beat leaves

 Skillet chicken with creamed beat leaves

If you’re looking to add more greens to your plates, this is a great start. Beet leaves are delicious, sweeter than spinach which will score points with the kids and so pretty. Combined with ever popular chicken and cream that makes everything taste better, its…

Whole braised cauliflower kapama

Whole braised cauliflower kapama

Kapama is a traditional way of braising in Greece, by placing a pot on top of a baking tray. I first tasted cauliflower kapama made the traditional way at my Aunt Sophia’s. This is an everyday, simple dish, usually served during the period of Lent before Christmas. So she was quite surprised at my enthusiasm for such a simple dish.

This recipeis a slightly dressed up version, keeping with the original flavors, but preparing the cauliflower whole as seems to be the fashion these days. This way, the upgraded version makes a nice centerpiece for out vegetarian friends or for dinners during Lent. It’s also more attractive to the kids, who are very interested in cutting wedges of the red cauliflower to reveal a white heart.

Aside from a nice, round, medium sized cauliflower, you will need a large flameproof casserole pot, suitable for both the oven and the stove. I tend to use my dutch oven for this. Do check the the cauliflower fits the pot, before you start. Ask me how I know…

By braising in the oven and then in the steam of the sauce, we get a beautifully cooked cauliflower, both tender and holding its shape with a bite to it.

 Recipe

  • 1 medium cauliflower
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 onions, sliced
  • 2 cloves of garlic, sliced
  • 1 tbsp tomato paste
  • 70 ml vinegar
  • 500 gr tomato, grated
  • 3 allspice berries
  • salt and pepper
  • Optional: kalamata olives and chopped parsley for serving

 

Preheat the oven to 200C.

Remove any wilted leaves from the cauliflower and submerge in water with vinegar to get rid of any previous occupants. Rince and dry. Cut of the end of the stem, so that it sits well. Using a paring knife core the base of the stem. Coat with 1 tbsp of the olive oil and roast in the oven for 15′.

In the meantime heat a large pot on a medium heat. Add the remaining oil, onions and a little salt and cook for about 5′, until soft. Add the garlic, stir and add the tomato paste and all spice. Cook stirring for 30″ then add the vinegar. Allow to reduce for 2′, then add the tomato and season. Brind to a mediume boil for 5′.

At this stage the cauliflower should be ready. Transfer to the pot carefully and baste with the tomato sauce. Cover and put in the oven for 30′. Check half way through cooking time and add a little water to loosen the sauce if needed.

Once it’s done, transfer to a large serving plate spooning over the sauce. Serve with the olives, parsley and a little olive oil.

Greek Sofigado stew with quince

Greek Sofigado stew with quince

Sofigado is a traditional recipe from the Ioanian island of Lefkada made with yearling goat or lamb. Modern versions include beef, but the strong deep-flavored sweet and sour sauce really complements darker red meats. As potatoes used to be scarce towards the end of autumn,…

Olive Bread with herbs

Olive Bread with herbs

When I first wrote about the wonderful no-knead bread dough that waits patiently in the fridge for whenever you need it, I promised you variations like this delicious olive-bread with herbs. It can be a quick snack on its own. If you have 3 minutes…

Baked eggs in two ways

Baked eggs in two ways

I was very lucky to see a recipe of Jamie Oliver’s for baked eggs on Sunday morning. I happened to have all the ingredients for the Mexican version and decided to try it. I admire him incredibly for his quality, well-designed recipes. His simple presentation and clear instructions were an inspiration to me. I really felt that following him could make me a very good cook. The most important thing though is his dedication to quality: free range animal products, traditional recipes and balanced dietary choices.

As I was preparing the eggs, I remembered the Turkish eggs I wanted to try and kept putting it off. Mostly, because it involved 2-3 pots as well as poaching eggs, which is not, exactly my strong point. So I thought I’d use the basic principles of Jamie Oliver’s recipe and apply them to Turkish eggs. The experiment worked, it was delicious. In this version the whole process does not take more than 10 ‘-12 ‘ including preparation. This means that you can have them for breakfast even on a weekday, or for a quick meal on a busy day.

Take a look at both recipes and see which one you prefer.

Jamie Olivier’s Mexican Style Baked Eggs

You will find the original here. I’ve made absolutely no changes, because the man is a genius.

Baked Turkish Eggs

  • 250 ml Greek yogurt
  • 1 small clove of garlic, crushed
  • 2 large eggs, free range
  • 2 tbsps clarified butter
  • 1 tbsp paprika
  • A pinch of chili flakes
  • Salt and pepper

Preheat oven to hottest setting. Stir the garlic and a little salt into the yogurt. Lightly grease a small ovenproof dish with butter and spread the yogurt. Make two dents that will hold the eggs. Break break an egg into each dent carefully. Bake for about 8 minutes, or until the egg whites are set and the yolks are still runny.

Meanwhile, melt the butter, add the paprika and chili flakes and stir well until incorporated. Take the eggs out of the oven and pour the butter over them. Season with salt and pepper and serve with sourdough bread.

How to always have nutritious pulses handy

How to always have nutritious pulses handy

When preparing beans I usually soak and sprout twice the amount needed for my recipe. Leftover pulses are stored in the freezer for immediate use in another recipe. What does “sprouting” mean? First, I wash the pulses well. Then, I soak them in plenty of…

How to have fresh bread every day

How to have fresh bread every day

There must be a Dutch oven or no-knead bread recipe on almost every self-respecting food blog or site. When Mark Bittman first mentioned Jim Lahey’s recipe, in 2006, in the NY Times, it became one of their most popular articles. The use of the Dutch…

“Lemonato” Beef with broccoli and lemon sauce

“Lemonato” Beef with broccoli and lemon sauce

In the midst of this constant barrage of information on modern nutrition, the value of vegetables remains constant and undeniable. In the traditional Mediterranean diet, we very often see imaginative combinations of vegetables with (sometimes only a little) meat or fish, depending on the season and the local cuisine. I think it’s the lack of time that has taken us away from this tradition. The result is to limit our sides to the classic starches such as rice, potatoes and pasta. They last long and cook fast, but as we rely on them every day, we forget that so many other options are available.

I really believe that variety ensures nourishment. On the other hand, especially midweek, I really really don’t want to have any extra pots to deal with. So I try to incorporate as many vegetables as I can, into our main meal. Combined it with a raw salad, I can be pretty sure we’re covering our daily requirements. I use the variety of colors as a guide to ensure the variety of nutrients on our plate. So I will combine this green-dominated dish with a colourful salad with white and red cabbage, carrot and pepper.

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp ghee or olive oil
  • 1 kg free range beef, cut into chunks
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 2 leeks, finely chopped
  • 2 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
  • 750 ml approx broth or water, heated
  • 2 tsp coriander, crushed
  • Juice and grated zest of 1 lemon
  • 1 tbsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 broccoli, divided into florets
  • Salt and pepper

Heat a heavy bottomed pan well. Dry the meat well and lightly season. Add the oil to the pan and saute the meat from on sides in batches. Keep the meat aside and add the onion and leek to the pan. Cook for 5 minutes until softened. Add the garlic with the coriander and immediately after that, add the meat. Stir well and add enough hot broth, so that it almost covers the meat. Lower the heat and let it simmer until the meat is done, about 1 hour. Check in between, in case you need to add a little hot broth or water.

Peel the main stem of the broccoli and cut it into slices. Stir the mustard into the lemon juice until it dissolves well. Once the meat is done, add the lemon with the mustard and the broccoli stem and stir well. Arrange the broccoli florets over the meat so that they cook in the steam of the sauce. Cover and let the broccoli steam for 10 minutes until cooked through. Adjust the seasoning and serve warm with the lemon zest.

Roast chicken with corn and chickpeas

Roast chicken with corn and chickpeas

This is one of our favorite recipes, made throughout late summer and early autumn. With the beautiful Indian summer we’ve been having this October, I was happy to make it with the last fresh corn from the Farmer’s market. Like a farewell to the bright…